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Thread: Mast overhaul

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Macatawa Michigan
    Posts
    17

    Mast overhaul

    Winter will be in Michigan before we know it, looking to overhaul the mast this winter. How much does it weight?. I'm debating having the marina take it down 300.00 down 300.00 up, so 600.00. Or is it just as easy to rent a cherry picker do it over a weeks time while still on the commander. I ask the weight because i want to replace the wooden mast base at the same time, so i would have to lift the mast with a picker.Looked the search box for weight found everything else just not the pounds i was looking for. Any suggestions or comments on what to do and not do will greatly help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,265
    There are several threads that include info on stepping the mast. See the Off Topic forum for guidance.

    Best way to search -- use Google and type in its search box: "site: pearsonariel.org (space) stepping the mast" [NO space between the colon : and pearson. You'll find a thread named something similar to "guidance to stepping mast," or something such as that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549

    mast weight - demasting

    The weight of the Ariel almag extrusion is around 70lbs.
    Length of Ariel mast 30'3" - don't know if the Commander's is the same length.
    The Ariel/Commander Manual
    states the weight of the extrusion to be 2.33lbs a foot.
    With the rigging, fittings, track, blocks, spreaders, winches, electric wire, mast head, bird poop, all the stuff inside and out
    .....probably 100-110 lbs,. maybe more?

    If the mast has never been moved before, be aware that there is a cast aluminum heel fitting
    attached to the bottom of the extrusion that mortices into the mast step. It might take extra upward force to dislodge.
    The step removes separately, after the mast is off.
    There is a thread or two on this site that shows a bunch of guys taking down the mast BY HAND using an A-frame.

    In your case, it would be worth $600 (less a couple sixpacks) to find.
    Don't know how to locate it using our eccentric search function. Can be found asking google. Good luck!
    .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ...........................................

    [later EDIT
    YES. here is a great thread with dozens of ideas..... on google:

    Dropping the mast by hand - Ariel - Commander Yacht Association]


    Can also be done from a bridge with a block & tackle. On a quiet day!
    Last edited by ebb; 08-26-2013 at 10:39 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Macatawa Michigan
    Posts
    17
    Thanks ebb that's exactly what I was looking for, the weight and someone saying just spend the money. And yes the search box is not always the best way for info. I'll keep you updated

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549
    What I meant, was that instead of getting fleeced by a $600 yard charge,
    it would be more fun, even exciting, to figure out how to lower it yourself
    -with a few friends.

    Of course if you can spare the fee: they do the work, provide the crane to hoist the stick, and a couple of their own guys to handle the lines,
    corral the stays&shrouds, lay the mast horizontal where you want it and bob's yer uncle.

    My yard has a the same fee for the service.


    Had my local mechanic who extracted 100s/1000s of dollars over the years keeping my 300,000mile detroit dodge on the road.
    Engine-light came on, first time ever. Turns out it was the exhaust sensor,
    the one when you smog your vehickle the result goes from the smog shop straight to your state's DMV computers.
    $302.
    When I staggered a little, he made the mistake of telling me that 'half of the bill is a 'finders fee'.
    Translation: Hoist yer wallet fee.
    Looked it up on the internet. What it is, it's a little plastic gizmo with a computer chip you plug into a port in the dash
    that has a little screen the tells you exactly what's wrong when the engine-light lights up. No thinking tool.
    You can buy one, I think back then it was cheaper than the finders fee he charged me.
    And I had given him so much steady work, even bringing him the farm's pickups for servive.

    In looking up what the hell this engine light BS is about, I ran into heated discussions on forums,
    and discovered that all mechanics do the same thing. Because what does a chump do when his frickin engine light goes on?

    Never went back to his shop. He was expensive, he kept me rolling, but that was the last straw.
    Was hard......and I've always regretted it.


    So maybe you treat youself to the professional "hoist fee", having the stick taken off the boat.
    By the time it's ready next spring, you'll be able to tilt it back up yourself!
    .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ..............................
    "Never give a sucker an even break, or smarten up a chump." WCFields
    Last edited by ebb; 08-28-2013 at 09:23 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,100
    I didn't see it here but Cmdr Pete (remember him) used a wooden A-frame along with various lines, blocks, friends to raise C200's big stick one year. Cap'n K did an outstanding job thinking outside the box by using an extension ladder. Everybody has one of them hanging around leaning up against the house. The impressive thing to me is Kurt did his mast lowering while Katie Marie was in the water.

    There is something about ponying up the Rubels to have professionals deal with it in the off-chance there is a hiccup.
    My home has a keel.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    San Francisco - or Abroad
    Posts
    430
    The mast The mast is not that heavy (100 - 110lbs is about right) But it is unwieldy, an donce it starts moving it is hard to stop...

    You do not need a prefessional rigger, but having a picking point above is important to keep the task simple & easy...

    The mast is locked in to the mast base to prevent lateral movement simply by a key at the bottom of the mast fitting which fits into the mast step. This is only about 1" deep. Once you take the load, the mast is essentially free at the bottom... (No need to pull-up). If you are usong the spreaders as a picking point watch out for it may want to flip on you...

    One more thing... The mast fitting should stay with the mast!!! (there are some screws at the bottom fitting and often people think this has to come apart.... - It does not.

    Also, Be aware that if you have lights / instruments at the top, you'll have to disconnect wires once the mast is clear of the deck - so don't let the crews yank the mast off assuming it is all clear or they'll destroy the wiring. Hopefully you'll have neat & quick plugs connecting the wires at that point to avoid cutting them... - If not it may be a good time to install some!

    Good luck!

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