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Thread: Commander Compression Post Discussions

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    The mast step seems to be in very good shape.

    The cracks in the deck under it don't look so good. Gotta be a rotten deck.

    On the inside, I really don't think your problem has anything to do with the compression post itself. You should be able to chisel out the old wedge-shaped pad at the top of the post and pound a new one into place.

    Then re-core the deck leaving the bottom skin in place.

    In any event, I took another look at my cabin sole. It looks like there was a seperate section of flooring installed around the post (between the two bilge hatches) about 4 "planks" wide.

    This might explain how they installed the post with the deck on.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Manchester, MA
    Posts
    151
    CommanderPete,

    Yup, that is my conclusion as well. I am still chicken about doing exposed glass work. I glassed in the holes fom my old VDO skeg and Display head, and neither were pretty but they work. It's not that I don't know how to do it but I want to know what the cost is of having it pretty. He has done other work for me and does a very nice job.

    When he went over the coach roof, he said it sounded good with the mallet, but that his meter picked up several wet spots. So I am waiting for his quote.

    I aw the junction of the floor. I think that they tabbed the pad to the roof simply to keep it from moving around. That way they could pick up the entire roof - deck molding and just drop in place after the did the furniture and placed the post. Just a guess, but it makes sense.
    John G.
    Valhalla
    Commander No 287

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    50

    Compression Post

    Hi Pearson folks,
    How's the sailing?
    We have a question about our compression post, not actually the mast. At some point in time, a previous owner installed a cute little table in the cabin (uwhich we have currently removed ) and drilled some holes in the post to hold the table up. We were wondering if it is okay to fill those holes with some thick goopy schmagma-like epoxy and then paint the post white. Is there any reason that this wold not be okay? ..Also, does anyone know what the post is made of? We really want to make our interior nice, and thought this added paintjob would only enhace it.
    Thanks for any supplied info!
    Anthony/Bina
    #155
    Last edited by Bill; 04-02-2005 at 08:38 AM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Hampton Roads Va.
    Posts
    821

    Smile Martha Stewart Says!

    Better yet, drive a dowel into the hole set in a little epoxy .

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    I believe the post is steel.

    If the holes aren't too big you might be able to fill them with JB Weld (from the auto parts store).

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099

    Did you know...

    The city of Dallas, Texas repaired a cracked Catapillar engine block with J-B Weld and saved $4,000.00 plus thirty days down time.

    That's one incredible project mamager to get that many people to work together on one thing!

    I guess the gennie is out of the tubes....

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Channel Islands, CA
    Posts
    5

    Mast - compression post for thru bolts?

    Working on the mast for Ariel #400....and looking for some advise
    Removing the through bolts for both the spreaders and uppers - I found that there are no compression posts for these bolts to prevent the mast from being distorted or crushed. Is this the normal state of things?
    I am also busy trying to remove the mast base to adapt a mast hinge - has anyone used a slide hammer to whale away at the base?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    Don't think a post is needed. The load is pretty spread out and probably not too great.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    San Francisco - or Abroad
    Posts
    430
    While I had my mast down, I decided to retrofit compression pipes at the spreader brackets on the mast.

    You can read-up on the concept, and can see the pictures of the install here (post #87+):
    http://www.pearsonariel.org/discussi...ead.php?t=1552
    Last edited by Rico; 09-08-2009 at 09:43 AM.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Camden, NC
    Posts
    283

    I have removed two compression posts from Commanders

    Hello all,
    I have experience removing and working the area of the compression posts on Commanders, don't know if there are any outstanding questions that I can help shed some light on. Here's a couple of points though:

    1) The compression post is schedule 80 anodized aluminum.
    2) The sole was installed first, then the post lowered down through the forward hatch and inserted into the cabin sole hole at a slight angle.
    3) The lower end of the post sits on a built up fiberglass base in the bildge. Most likely with wood somewhere inside. The post itself is not glassed in.
    4) The wooden wedge between the top of the post and the underside of the cabin is made of teak. The wedge is necessary for the same reasons the mast base has a slope to it.
    5) Pearson cored the entire cabin roof, to include (unfortunately) the area immediatedly under the mast step.
    6) The core is 3/8 inch end grain balsa.
    7) Any detected movement is a sure sign that the balsa's integrity has been compromised. ie, water intrusion followed by rot / decay.
    8) No work should be attempted with the spar (mast) up.
    9) To remove the compression post strip away the very light tabbing around top of the post and with a block of wood drive the top of the post directly forward. Remember, the post was installed through the cabin sole hole at an angle and will come out at an angle. The biggest challenge will of course be in overcoming any downward movement the cabin roof made due the core failure.

    I'll leave it at that for now, unless there are more questions of repair, etc..

    Thanks,
    Chance.
    Respectfully,
    Chance Smith
    (Formerly) Sea Sprite 23 #760 (Heritage)
    (Formerly) Commander #256 (Ceili)

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Brooksville, FL
    Posts
    714

    Thanks Chance

    I appreciate your post.

    Have you replaced the compression post with a laminated support beam yet? If so is the process detailed here someplace?

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Camden, NC
    Posts
    283

    No laminated beam

    Your welcome.
    No, I'm not replacing the standard compression post for a built up beam of some sort. On the commander, it is my belief that the compression post is the best way to go. If one were to say, want to remove it and do something like the Ariels set up, it would take major interior redesign and careful calculations to address the tremendous loads that the compression post carries, then where to fit everything in such a small cabin layout.
    For an idea take a look at the Kittiwake's interior configuration, which is another Carl Alberg design. The cabin interior is small and there are what amounts to two load bearning posts on each side of the centerline cabin sole.

    Thanks.
    Respectfully,
    Chance Smith
    (Formerly) Sea Sprite 23 #760 (Heritage)
    (Formerly) Commander #256 (Ceili)

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    By chance, does anyone have a photo or two of the bottom end of the compression post? It would be helpful to see just what Pearson deemed sufficient in the bilge to hold up the mast.
    My home has a keel.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Brooksville, FL
    Posts
    714

    Tony

    Here is a picture of my post bottom. It does not look like the base it sits on was glassed very well.
    Attached Images  
    JERRY CARPENTER - C147
    A man can succeed at almost anything for which he has unlimited enthusiam.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    San Francisco - or Abroad
    Posts
    430
    I have seen a handful of post bases and they've all looked very similar to Jerry's picture above. It is not as pretty as the rest of the boat, but since this component works only under compression, it is built solidly enough. There is a teak block underneath the mess of glass as far as I've seen. I've cleaned-up C-155's a bit, but I decided to leave it alone as it is a hard area to work in unless you have the sole out - and I did not want to do that...
    If you do some work in this area remember to provide drainage underneath or water will pool-up in the front... I've seen this too.

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