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Thread: Ariel entered in Single Handed Transpac Race

  1. #1
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    Ariel entered in Single Handed Transpac Race

    Although sanity may set in at any time, I've entered Ad Astra (formerly "Jubilee") in the Transpac. With a rating of 258, she has the highest handicap of all the entrants thus far.

    The challenge is going to be getting there in 21 days. I plan to fly twin jibs and forego spinnakers entirely.

    Any suggestions from the esteemed members here will be much appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Exclamation AD ASTRA....alis volat propiis

    Altho I haven't been boiled yet

    will say sanity isn't preferred to enter a singlehand race

    but courage. You have plenty of that stuff.


    Best luck!! Tell us about it!!

    Especially balance and course keeping!!

    and....sleeping........



    EDIT: doesn't this race require an emergency rudder --

    whatz your solution?
    Last edited by ebb; 03-07-2016 at 02:34 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebb View Post

    EDIT: doesn't this race require an emergency rudder --

    whatz your solution?
    Yes, it does. I'm thinking of a long narrow rudder blade inserted into the engine port, clamped in place at the engine mount. Its tiller will interfere with the traveler, but that's a minor inconvenience.

  4. #4
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    This thread has been "stuck" in the proper forum . . Sailing & Events. Sticking it at the head of the forum makes it easy for us to follow the adventure.

  5. #5
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    Fantastic! You know you've got a whole fleet of Ariel/Commanders rooting for ya.
    Mike
    Totoro (Sea Sprite 23 #626)

  6. #6
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    spare rudder

    Perfect place for the spare. Virtually a drop in situation in two or three pieces.
    Cassette in well - drop in blade - tiller. Nice.
    Might be a bit tight for 50 degree angles(?)

    Read somewhere a guy liked his narrow spare so much he altered the boat to keep it.

    Had an idea for a hypalon inflatable blade....

    Post a photo of your red over green from cockpit or foredeck!! please.

    ALSO, OF COURSE, please tell us how your non-windvane, COURSE KEEPING ABILITY
    works out ! ! !
    Last edited by ebb; 03-13-2016 at 10:55 AM.

  7. #7
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    Trailer for sale/rent/loan?

    The trip back by sail is nearly twice as long, in terms of time, as the voyage to Hawaii.

    I'm still in the planning phases, but I may decide to ship Ad Astra back. Matson offers return shipping from the island on a Ro-Ro boat, but I'll need a trailer.

    Does anyone have a trailer for sale, rent, or loan? I'll need to ship the trailer ahead, so I'd need it for about 2 months.

    Thanks!

  8. #8
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    I just sailed back from Svedsen's with shiny bright new standing rigging that, thanks to the tabernacled mast, I was able to remove and replace myself.

    I've made some mods so far:

    HEADING DEVIATION ALARM: For worry-free sleep, I've installed a Clipper Marine Steering Compass that has a heading deviation alarm. Since it has a flux gate compass sensor, I can place the sensor in an optimal location away from my radios and other magnetic stuff, making it more accurate than my mechanical compass in the cockpit. In a boat as small as mine, it's hard to place anything far away from anything else.

    LEARN NOT TO BURN: I experienced a propane explosion and fire while crewing on another boat. Fortunately, the skipper alone got only minor flash burns (though she wasn't happy about losing most of her hair), and we put out the ensuring fire (fabric curtains). I can't think of anything more terrifying than a fire at sea in a fiberglass boat. Ever since, I've vowed I'd be more inclined to carry nitroglycerin on board. I've installed a 3,000 watt inverter to run a microwave for cooking. A cup of steaming coffee "costs" 3 amp hours, and a meal costs 6 amp hours.

    RAIN/SPRAY PROOFING A TILLER PILOT: Raymarine tiller pilots need some protection from rain and spray. I cover the switches and LCD window with plastic wrap (Saran Wrap) that I seal at the top and bottom with 3M masking tape (the blue stuff). I considered a fabric casing, but that would partially prevent the tiller pilot from dissipating heat. The vent at the bottom back needs to stay open to prevent moisture retention, so complete immersion will still kill the device. The pushrod, which has a 9 inch throw, isn't completely water tight at its entry into the box and it will convey water into the electronics. Some people have tried using a coating of Vaseline, but that will eventually gum up the inside. So.... what resilient, puncture resistant, water-tight covering could one use to cover a tubular object? Humm... A condom! I seal the condom at the shaft hilt with mastic tape (use unlubricated condoms so the tape will stick). Works great so far! I did have to try a few brands before I found one (Trojan) that would stretch to the 9 inch throw without showing signs of strain. (You should have seen the look on the lady pharmacist's face when I complained that: "These aren't long enough. What do you have that stretches to 9 inches?") BTW, when you buy a tiller pilot, take it out of the box at the store, shake it a little, and if you hear something rattling around inside - it's loose solder beads inside the case that are just waiting to short a circuit board tracing. Raymarine assembly folks need lessons in proper soldering. I rejected three units in a row by this test. They'd dribbled solder all over making the connections to the drive motor.

  9. #9
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    I completed a shakedown cruise earlier this week. I discovered my Ariel doesn't perform well with 1,000 pounds of cargo, most of which is required by the Race Rules. Details of the cruise are here: http://sfbaysss.org/forum/showthread...4646#post14646. The course sailed is here: http://aprs.fi/#!mt=hybrid&z=11&ts=1...all=a%2FN8QH-9

  10. #10
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    extra weight

    Your extra weight showing up as a plowing problem - and sluggishness - is very frightening to me ! ! !

    Where is your 'normal' waterline?

    I had trouble translating the designed waterline (from the Manual drawings that are signed by Alberg) onto littlegull when I tried to establish it when painting the boottop. Never really found it to my satisfaction. Discovered the designed line was far below what my boat had been sailing with. Do we know where the actual waterline is on current active sailing Ariels? Is there a consensus? How can we measure and share that info? (I took my measure from the sheer of copyshop 'to scale' rendition of the Alberg
    original. And converted it to the boat.)

    Sluggish handling is not a usual description of Ariel attributes. 1000lbs cargo seems entirely reasonable!

    50 years ago Ariel was described as a MORC racer/CRUISER.

    When hauling for bottom work, the weight of the boat should be indicated by the crane or travel-life. Does the 5180lb stated Ariel weight include all the stuff of a fully found vessel? Understand a racing version would not carry heavyweight
    anchors and chain, or a liferaft, or extra fuel.
    Last edited by Bill; 06-03-2016 at 02:44 PM. Reason: format

  11. #11
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    I measured the waterline relative to what it was before loading, so the exact draft is unknown. I measured the freeboard at the aft lower shroud chainplate, from the top of the toe rail to the water. Before: 2 feet 2 inches. After: 1 foot, 11 inches. That's the average of both port and starboard measurements, since there was an inch or so variance depending on port/starboard balance.

    On board for the shakedown cruise was:
    • Batteries: 300 pounds (358 A/H)
    • Gasoline generator: 40 pounds
    • Full sail inventory: 60 pounds
    • Life raft: 65 pounds
    • Unconsumed food, water, (simulated by 200 lbs of lead shot) and spares including 2 anchors with a total of 400 feet of rode and 35 feet of chain (the race rules require an anchor and I'd have to anchor after arriving): 300 pounds
    • Fuel for generator (6 gallons): 36 pounds
    • Myself: 200 pounds
    • Total: 1,001 pounds

    Add to that cargo another 65 pounds for the outboard.

    The boat was a slug with all that weight and pitched down 3 to 5 degrees underway (I installed a pitch inclinometer). It was in a pitch-level attitude at the slip. In 11 knots average wind, 60 degrees off the bow (my best point of sail), there was no pitch oscillation ("hobby horsing"), but the bow buried and plowed through swells and I averaged 3.9 knots over 130 miles (both tacks). That translates to 24.6 days to Hawaii - the race cutoff is 21 days. Even factoring for 0.5 knots of assistive current and following seas, it's doubtful I'd make it within 21 days. The ride in moderate swells was "normal" (that is to say - mostly terrible), if not a little subdued. I had to run a jackline along the overhead to stand up. I resorted to that after I fell and broke the starboard side seat back. Sleeping on the port side berth was OK, in fact quite comfortable, except for a few moments of near weightlessness in swells. I wouldn't recommend it for anyone susceptible to seasickness (which I'm not).

    You can see my comments here that I posted along the track: https://share.delorme.com/AdAstra. You have to zoom into the track for all of the comments to appear. I used the Delorme satellite tracker texting capability as my log.

    At no time was the boat unstable. It seldom heeled past 15 degrees (with all that weight below).

    After considering all the factors, including the possibility of water in the keel, I withdrew.

    At least now I have a fully upgraded boat ready for serious coastal cruising: with a life raft, properly installed manual bilge pump (Whale Titan), new standing rigging, backup AIS display and chartplotter, an extra downwind sail for flying twin jibs, and the knowledge that adding 1,000 pounds to an Ariel is a bit too much...
    Last edited by pbryant; 05-31-2016 at 06:30 PM.

  12. #12
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    Exclamation littlegull's WL

    When my boat as "SunQuest" left the water years ago, I did not measure where the
    waterline was. Boat has not seen water since.
    .
    I've spent an inordinate amount of time, measuring and remeasuring the boat using
    the autographed Alberg lines drawing in the Manual, pg144.
    This drawing shows an Ariel with a curved sheer of about 3" at its center -- at the aft
    chainplate. This is not the only

    DESIGN ANOMALY
    MY PEARSON ARIEL HAS A DEAD STRAIGHT SHEER FROM STEM TO STERN.

    Nevertheless, I've used the Alberg drawing as my bible.
    The waterline on the drawing measures 30" below the top of the toerail.

    It's impossible to understand how Pearson managed to straighten Alberg's sheer!*
    Yesterday, I took a yardstick to see what I had painted on the littlegull. The 30"
    measure is to the bottom of the bootstripe. Obviously, I think the drawing doesn't lie.

    BUT, therefore, my waterline is 3" higher that what the drawing witnesses, since my
    toerail is 3" higher than the toerail in the drawing. That's what I laid out on the boat.

    WE DON'T KNOW WHERE THE FACTORY PUT THE ORIGINAL WATERLINE, do we?
    I'll be witness at splash time, won't I? (Actually, ebhb. you've made so many changes
    and additions, littlegull's waterline is your waterline wherever.)

    There is also no way of knowing exactly what total displacement the Ariel has. There
    are different displacements in the literature. I don't know if there ever was an actual
    total weight of an Ariel, and what it included. Assume it's something over 5,000lbs.

    Either we take what the drawing seems to show, OR there is another, a Pearson, norm.
    My Ariel has languished out of the water long enough to have no water left in the
    laminate, or in the balsa core of the deck composite, or in the encapsulated keel.

    So that's them apples!!!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    *Alberg's drawing does have a straight line just above the curvy toerail, which
    shows the crown of the deck at the centerline. Maybe Pearson got confused and used
    the wrong line.
    Last edited by ebb; 06-03-2016 at 08:53 AM.

  13. #13
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    I seem to recall my dad telling me that Ariels sailed this race in the "early" days. True? If so I guess the race rules require significant weight additions. Would be informative for a comparison of then vs now in terms of weight. Any race historians? I'm not sure what defines the early days, but I presume it's the sixties!

    Ebb, the waterline on Charisma is between indentation lines in the glass, subtle but there nonetheless. Factory? Not my dad for sure! Bow sits an inch or so above the waterline, and stern sits on it. Depends on how full my original Monel water tank is. Charisma is outboard model. I'll measure at some point, but maybe Bill will not like us talking about water lines here!
    Last edited by Hull376; 06-01-2016 at 11:06 AM.
    Kent

  14. #14
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    Kent, assume you agree with pbryant's 26" of freeboard?

    Can't argue with those cast-in-gelcoat waterlines, can we?
    Assume the boat was delivered with topsides down to here and bottom paint up to here!
    If the waterline fluctuated, is there an average location on the 440 Ariel's produced?

    If your yardsticks are like my yardstick,
    Then Pearson also may have changed the waterline (from the Alberg original).

    Assume that the resin and glass schedule was kept the same throughout the model run.
    Altho there are posts here of earlier Ariels with much thicker layups below the turn of
    the bilge. Assume those boats floated deeper, or did the waterline fluctuate?
    Assume a newly purchased 1965 Areil would always float exactly on her "lines".
    Maybe an inch of bottom showing.
    It takes a lot of expert fiddling to tape for an altered waterline under the counter.
    Pearson could have at any time moved the embedded "glass" waterline, as well.

    Looks like my bootstripe is going to be under water (and I naturally have used the
    wrong paint down there for that. DANG!)
    Remember I ran into those same lines you'all have, when stripping the bottom paint,
    but lost them in all the excitement!


    Still, I'm really unhappy with the reported sluggish sailing on what really seems to be a
    mildly overloaded boat...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~
    There are a few more important anomalies on the underwater aspect of the Ariel, which
    are not appropriate for discussion here. I've talked about them elsewhere. Hope
    --on littlegull -- some of the sluggishness of an overloaded cruising Ariel is diminished.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~


    AHOY ACTIVE ARIELS ! ! !

    CAN ANYONE ELSE CONFIRM THE 26" TOERAIL TO WATERLINE FREEBOARD?
    (measured at the aft chainplate.)
    Last edited by ebb; 06-03-2016 at 09:06 AM.

  15. #15
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    Copied the water line part of this thread to the Technical forum. Please continue that part of the discussion there . . .
    Last edited by Bill; 06-03-2016 at 02:50 PM.

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