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Thread: EBB's PHOTO GALLERY THREAD

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands
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    114
    Bil, Appreciate the photos but you need to get them under control! Here's my method:

    1. Drag the photo into Paint. (If you have Windows, you should have Paint in your programs.) It is found under "Accessories" in Programs. I put "Paint" on my desktop so I can easily drag the photo into it.

    2. Once the photo is opened up in Paint, go to Image.
    then select "Stretch". Then downsize, "50" works well in the horizontal and vertical boxes.

    3. Then save it wherever.

    Its a rather lengthy process that I detest, however it works. If there is an easier way, which I can't believe there isn't in this day and age of computer advances, somebody PLEASE let me know.

    Now for that busy busy guy, Ebb, what is the purpose for the half circles in the chain locker, and what is that beautiful work of art shown in the last photo?

    And Happy holidays to you all. I'm heading up North hopefully for a white New England Christmas.


    Last edited by Janice Collins; 12-18-2002 at 03:03 AM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    262

    Ebb:

    now that you have that chain locker (a) where is your head going to be installed and (b) what are you going to do with the volume forward of the chainlocker?

    what is the story with the OB well? is it an attempt to seal it off from the bilge and let the water drain from the well all by itself? or is it designed to ship the water into the cockpit so those drains can take care of it?

    i really like the half circles in the vertical supports on the chain locker. are they there so you have access to tab/glass/glue/affix the small "shelves"?

    but really beautiful work there, even if it doesn't all fit on my screen at once.

    out
    km#3

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549

    half circle cutouts

    Ok kids,
    You'll notice first that the ledge over the cutouts is what remains of the original Vberth after excising the bow tank per the Manual's instructions.
    The pieces with the cut outs are verticals that match the fore and aft bulkheads.

    The idea is to have two poly boxes (troughs) made that would have a lip that would go over the ledge and be cinched down with permanent bolts coming up thru the ledge. Two bookmatched boxes separated foreandaft down the middle. The bolts would be long enuf to drop on lids that would be held down with wing nuts. To keep chain in place when the boat is "inverted."

    These half circle openings are for access to insert the bolts up thru the holes and hold the heads to tighten.

    After all ten bolts are jam nutted, the locker is to be Xmatted with epoxy, Four sides of the locker and the bottom. The holes will be spanned with the mat. hopefully creating a waterproof interior. It may need another layer of cloth to be sure. Then the poly boxes are to be made (but I'm still upset that no custom poly tank maker could be found willing or capable of making the new side watertanks.) So I think plywood will be a good alternative. And it's more replaceable down the line. The boxes are fastened in place with their own set of nuts. The lid goes on over with its own wingnuts. All on the same bolts.

    The chainlocker and forepeak are in the 'crash bulkhead' watertight area so drainlines from each will be piped down the bilge to the sump. Screw-on caps or valves for control. One could hose out the forward lockers and pump it out from the sump under the companionway ladder.

    Conceivably, the cloth and epoxy over the unfilled hole will allow cutting out to replace a mangled bolt. Afterall this is the chain and anchor locker. Just paste a piece of cloth and resin back over the hole. The holes in the bottom of the chainlocker can also be cut out if a major repair is necessary to the hull from inside.

    Between the pvc pipes at the bottom of the new bulkhead in one of Bill's posters you'll notice a faint circle where the sonar thru-hull comes in. The sensor is molded into the cutwater edge of the stem. The actual sensor is not mounted yet. You may notice there is limited access under the chain locker here as well. This is where the bow tank supply was, the hole has been cut larger.

    The portapotti will be mounted on a new removable platform there in the Vee. I really like the concept of a composting toilet. Airhead is the obvious candidate because of its size (smaller than Sunmar) but it is way taller than the Thetaphart. Like the idea that if you are forced by the unenlightened to cargo yer effluent around you might as well compost it. Does require constant elecricity. P.S. has a recent evaluation.
    Last edited by ebb; 12-19-2002 at 01:10 PM.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,251

    Originally posted ahead of the other photos

    Ok, we have figured out how to
    reduce the photo size, but in the process, this pic got deleted and so had to be re posted here. Sorry about that. This is the first photo of the chain locker progress and was taken from just outside the forecabin.
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 12-19-2002 at 10:26 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,549

    OB well gambit

    (thanks, Bill, for the much easier ride down this thread!)

    Problem: Get an 8h Yamaha 4 stroke electric tilt to be happy in an antigue Ariel motor well.
    Problem: No way to get the motor's muscular multipurpose arm operational unless strate-up vertical with the added ignominy of the rather large hatch open and clipped to the backstay.
    Problem: Yamaha's muscular clamp drags in the water when mounted on original clamping board. [chorus, 'Get a Nissan 6, weighs only 20#!']

    Solution: Cut the blinking offending cross bridge away and raise the motor 4". No brainer. [chorus, 'Didn't take any brains to make That change.']
    A block and tackle end-of-boom mainsheet (no travelor) could conceivably still be mounted there. But a mid-boom (actually aft of mid-boom) sheet on the dodger frame over the companionway makes mucho better sense IMCO. I can see no structural compromise to the boat with the bridge taken out. [Chorus: hi-ho any engineers amongst us?]

    Of course I don't believe that 100%. SO. You can surmise from Bill's photo that the cockpit well is not connected to the bulkhead. While there still is access we can get in from the cabin thru the side lazarettes, the cockpit will be heavily tabbed to the bulkhead and the bulkhead tabbed to the hull (missing in 338 under the cockpit.)

    The white stuff in the photo is cardboard and doorskin. the ply clamp board is temporary. Playing with the space you can see what happens when you raise the 'gascan' deck up to the top of the original well. Looks to me we got at least an 8gal space each side (all the foam, everything's gone in the laz execept the well collar, so it's not hard to see.) Think: built in vinylester gas tank, bladder with access plate, foam positive flotation, or plain stowage - I opt for glassed in tanks. Who's going to insure this boat, anyway? OK, this gascan deck is the major element in the integrity of the well and the whole rear end of the Ariel. Distributes the vibration and loads of the motor thruout the stern. This could be the arguement FOR solid foam-in-place. What we took out was 3/8s fir ply with 1/4" laminate over. (remember, even that, all that polyester didn't keep water from entering the foam underneath.)

    Just raising the clampboard 4 inches seems to create a possibility that the arc of the motor may have more or less the same radius as it is tilted in relation to the rise of the stern and the transom. So if the same portion of the shaft protrudes from the boat a solution to the backwash problem might be a simple overlapping rubber gland to protect the opening yet let the motor slip up and down. Certainly the slot in the transom might be treated this way Like a backflow flap on a thru-hull. Then again, it may all be rubber duck's breath.
    Last edited by ebb; 12-20-2002 at 11:39 PM.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Southern Maryland
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    262

    engineer's opinion

    you asked...

    "I can see no structural compromise to the boat with the bridge taken out.[Chorus: hi-ho any engineers amongst us?]"

    actually, there are two parts to this story:

    1) the bridge was under a bending moment because of the forces on the mainsheet. it performed the function of keeping the two parts closer to horizontal. and really, the vertical parts ofteh bridge are the work-horses here, just like in a steel I-beam. without it you will see much more flexure of the two posts, upward, and the most severe flexure will happen when one of the two sheet-halves is exactly vertical from the deck (when the boom is right over the post) the degree of flexure, i don't know, i could run a few calcs if the moment strikes me and if "Marks handbook" has values for shear strength of fiberglass.

    2) the bridge was in compression. the two halves of the mainsheet angle toward each other and that component of the forces puts the bridge in compression. this means that the posts will have much greater flexture toward each other (in addition to the upward motion). this is greatest when the main is between the two posts, but is always evident regardless of boom position.

    some back-of the envelope calcs will some reduction in ultimate strength and increase in flexture, but really some Finite element analysis will show how much the surrounding structure supports the posts. attached is an image that i might use as my b.o.t.e. calcs.
    Attached Images  

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,549

    monocogue

    Ariel is essentially a monocogue, ie it is the skin that carries the forces put upon it.

    If you mounted blocks on either side of the opening where the 'bridge' was and pull up or sideways on them the stress is taken up instantaneously by a multitude of points strengthened by the curves and stiffened by the turns in the surface of the craft.

    The force could be so great on one point it might tear out a chunk - but the essential shape can't change. Of course there could be sheer forces that might delaminate the skin.

    Bulkheads keep the boat from twisting. Bamboo is an example of this construction. We have a matching set of longitudinal stiffners to insure against oilcanning - or shape changing, which really would compromise the structure. The more bulkheads, the better they are tabbed in, the less twist and canning. (I will bet that the sweet rounded form of the hull and it's thickness has never oil-canned in anybody's experience?)

    The problem of the missing bridge may be that there is not enuf bulkhead there to totally stabilize the aft end of our peapod. Suppose we think of it as just an extra long cockpit. Now that the bridge is down.

    That's why lifting the 'gascan' deck to make a horizontal bulkhead might help. Ribbing or flanges going up to the deck on the sides of the tilting slot may add some immobility. Altering that signature great-hatch by reconfiguring the deck back there - making it wider with a smaller hatch - keeping the look and sculpture, but only raise a center portion.

    The cockpit well is not connected to the companionway bulkhead or the aft bulkhead. It's just hanging in there - part of the deck mold. I'm convinced that the cockpit must be majorly married to the lazarette bulkhead. This ought to create solid bracing and stiffness for the new open and much longer than the Commander's cockpit. It's redundant strength, and over-building and weight, paranoia, etc - because IMCO the shape won't change. Have to keep it from twisting.

    Squeezed between two freighters? Sure. On a coral reef in a typoon... the boat's a sugar cube

    well, that's what I feel. You'ld have to perform actual tests on the boat to produce engineering data, wouldn't you, Capt Mrgnstn.....?
    Last edited by ebb; 12-28-2002 at 07:50 AM.

  8. #38
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    MAY 2003 UPDATE PHOTO #1

    Another visit to the Borregaard Yacht Works in San Rafael. This time, we will be looking at the progress on some of Ebb's more interesting modifications. Beginning with the outboard motor well:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:50 PM.

  9. #39
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #2

    View #2 of the ob well:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:50 PM.

  10. #40
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #3

    And the view from the outside:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:51 PM.

  11. #41
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #4

    Then there is the "new" foredeck hatch. Actually, it's to access the anchor chain from the chain locker:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:52 PM.

  12. #42
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #5

    Another view of the foredeck hatch:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:52 PM.

  13. #43
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #6

    Third & final . . .
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    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:52 PM.

  14. #44
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #7

    Let's go inside and take a look at the new chain locker:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:53 PM.

  15. #45
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    MAY 2003 PHOTO #8

    And the well in the chainlocker:
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 05-16-2003 at 02:54 PM.

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