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Thread: EBB's PHOTO GALLERY THREAD

  1. #331
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,549

    The spider and the fly

    As I walked by something caught my eye and I stopped.

    A crane fly was caught in a spider's web
    It furiously tried to get untangled, beating its wings, bouncing rhythmically in air.
    Each time the spider approached the fly became more frantic making the spider back off a little.
    The crane fly was more than twice the size of its captor.
    It seemed to be tiring. The bouncing stopped.
    The fly quietly and deliberately used a free leg to strip an invisible sticky thread from a fouled leg as the spider came closer and closer.
    Just as the spider was ready to pounce the leg came free!

    But the fly was still caught, it helicoptered its wings again and broke away,
    landing close by, seeming to shiver.
    The spider remained suspended and still poised to wrap up the catch of a lifetime.

    Watching the drama, I thought about helping the flier get loose from the trapper.
    Wondered if that would change the course of the universe.

    I was sure the fly wasn't going to make it.

    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________________
    Making some progress inside.
    Photo soon?
    Last edited by ebb; 04-22-2009 at 12:27 AM.

  2. #332
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    New Haven CT
    Posts
    33
    Ebb

    just want to say wow,
    like to see more pics, and just amazed
    Tim

  3. #333
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,247

    Post Photos By Ebb -- Peruse At Your Leisure

    Ebb has submitted a number of photos for review and approval for publication by the editors The editors take no responsibility, liability or any other 'ability' for that which follows . . .

  4. #334
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    The ketchup slide box starts as a simple stitch-n-glue closed box
    Attached Images  

  5. #335
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,247
    Easy Chair with side locker
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Bill; 12-29-2009 at 11:18 AM.

  6. #336
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    2,247
    Easy Chair in foreground with locker and slide box. Background shows galley without sink counter - sliding panel cupboard.
    Attached Images  

  7. #337
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    2,247
    Starboard dinette lockers with lift lids. Insulated hull with vinyl fabric. Uncovered Ensolite insulation glued in on top of hull. Top of photo is the unfinished cabin side hand rail.
    Attached Images  

  8. #338
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    Sep 2001
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    Orinda, California
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    Port side, left corner of foto is galley without sink - and easy chair.
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  9. #339
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    2,247
    Starboard side, dinette without hinged table.
    Attached Images  

  10. #340
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    Stub bulkheads glue up for cabin furniture. Easy Chair.
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  11. #341
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    Interior hand rail inserts glued thru cabin side.
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  12. #342
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    Compression beam being bolted thru the deck. Compression beam series of thru-deck bronze bolts. Center three go thru previously epoxy and Xmatt reconstruction directly under mast. Outer bolts pass thru composite balsa core with classic hockey-puck treatment - oversized holes and undercut skin. The original unglued support beam was locked in place with only two #16 bronze screws driven thru the circular mast-step into the beam under balsa-cored deck.
    Attached Images  

  13. #343
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    Red face for the reseacher in the use of cardboard in Ariel refurbishments

    EDIT (11/28/11)
    This date reference doesn't have any significance, except to record that the cupboard sliding door locker at #336 - pg17 on this thread
    has an 'how-it-was-made' confession over at TonyG's Gallery: Fruits Of My Labor - pg25 - #494.
    Last edited by ebb; 11-28-2011 at 09:06 AM.

  14. #344
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    Thanks Bill!!!!!

    Clarification.
    Photo at #341. Those red thingies are right angle pieces of fiberglass ("electrical grade") material from McMasterCarr.*
    The bottom flange sticks out on the inside of the cabin and a flat piece of the same material is cut to the cabin curve from bulkhead to bulkhead and glued on top, tying them all together. What follows is one way of adding interior handrails without using thru-bolts.

    They are not glued in when the photo was taken.
    However the hollow between liner and cabin molding has been filled and the vertical sides chamfered. An inside the liner donut with a square hole.

    When prepping / wetting out a clip for inserting into the hole, a cut-to-fit rectangular piece of glass is positioned like a scarf around the upright flange so that the fiberglass gets glued to inside of the liner when the clip is pushed into place.
    Fiberglass tails are brought outside, pasted to the sides of the hole. Then the hole filled and flange buried. After setting, the filler was faired and pieces of fabric sanded away.


    Interesting that the space is different in each hole between the cabin and the cabin liner.
    The space gets wider (about 1/4' to 5/8") toward the rear of the cabin as witnessed through the progression of holes.
    This converging space between liner and cabin is pretty equal port and starboard which would mean that the liner is centered pretty good in A338.
    ALSO the further forward toward the mast the thicker the cabin sides are laminated. There is less apparent space separating cabin and liner.
    Also, the molded curve of cabin into deck, right there at the deck where the Fein tool was used to cut in at deck level is very thick, very substantial and very hard.
    Smoked at least FIVE K-blades! 20 bucks EACH.

    After cutting the square holes and exposing the inside,
    there is barely enough room to sort of prep the inner surfaces that have been waiting 40 years for this event. But imco it HAS to be done.

    Since both cabin and liner were laid up in female molds we have to assume the last polyester resin coat put on in 1966 had wax in it so that it would cure hard.
    This wasn't the place to use a solvent to kill any wax. So carpet-taped pieces of 40 grit sanding belt on the ends of doorskin strips were used to scratch things up inside best I could.


    I've said this too many times:
    imco FIRST priming surfaces with liquid epoxy that will be filled with thickened epoxy is essential for 'secondary' bonding to bond.
    After priming - mop it up with a rag if it's really wet - SCRUB on some of the thickened stuff (toothbrush in this case) before actual filling to help get the old and the new to like each other even better.
    Sides, top and bottom are filled with mishmash using flexible foam rod for dams. This is all done at the same time.....But you needn't do all the holes at the same time!
    When hard, the holes were cleaned up (that's the stage in the photo at #341) and a slot cut in the liner through the bottom of the hole for the angle clip.

    With the holes prepped for the second time the clips were inserted.
    With the little piece of fiberglass bridle and the wedge shape of the second fill, can only hope they are solidly implanted and amalgamated with the cabin.
    I use the best available LAMINATING epoxy almost exclusively - for everything. Structural projects like this stretches the intent of the epoxy, which is really to laminate fabric together. However, imco NON-BLUSHING good epoxy is good glue.**

    The holes on the outside are disappeared now.
    You'd never know all these words took place there.

    Another set of right angle pieces will be glued under each projecting flange inside - upright and facing the cabin side. Just to make absolutely sure, will glue AND machine-screw the clips through the layers together.
    Mahogany rails attach to the uprights.
    A lot of weight will be put on this system at times.
    It looks like grab rails over at the side like this will get used not only for trapeze work but handing the body in and out of the seats/berths. An adult will be able to negotiate the accommodation with a hand on each rail, arms out-stretched. I think there is more ERGO in the dynamic of having rails at this lower level.

    We'll end up with closed channels under the windows. No other overhead rails are planned.
    Dang, hope this all makes sense.

    Haven't turned up another joker yet who's added railings this way.
    BUT this is how aye did it - not how IT is done.
    Critique appreciated
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________________
    *Hammer tested the strength of this red colored commercial polyester fiberglass angle and sheet. Also tested glue-ups. Looks like it's made with glass mat and perhaps pressed or rolled. Could be extruded. Epoxy glued pcs held and seems plenty strong. Angle material is 3/16" - the sheet exactly 1/8".
    Smells sweet when cut, but not the usual styrene scent. Used lacquer thinner to remove wax or manufacturing residues and scoured surfaces before gluing. Could have/should have used TSP or a citrus remover.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________________
    **If your MO working with epoxy in a renovation is to stop - let the epoxy set - and then go on to the next step which often requires gluing epoxy to epoxy - then blushing epoxy cannot be used in the type of work described above. Blushing epoxy requires washing grease off with detergent and warm water after every set.
    Explain to me how that can be done in the method described above.
    There is NO EXCUSE for a maker of epoxy in 2010 to sell you stuff that BLUSHES. OR has any SOLVENT in it.
    And by that score it is IRRESPONSIBLE for that formulator or the VENDOR to sell you hardener with formaldehyde in it.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________________
    The square holes in the side of the cabin and the slot the clips are inserted into were cut with a Fein Multimaster (sold to home owners). It comes with a dog-leg "E-Cut" blade which has small teeth on its leading edge and is able to plunge cut STRAIGHT into materials. I had to buy blades at a local hardware at about $60 in a three pack. If memory serves, used at least 6 blades to do the job. I think they were labeled 'bi-metal' but the old frp smoked them!!!
    Last edited by ebb; 11-28-2011 at 09:11 AM.

  15. #345
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549

    thru-bolted strongback

    #342
    I can tell you what I should have done with those four wide out bolts, maybe all six.

    I could have dished-out the hockey-puck tops like we do for any hole repair.
    Then epoxied two or three disks of fiberglass (widest diameter first) into each dish so that the edges of the new glass overlaps the venerable polyester deck.
    Then redrilled the holes through for the 3/8" SB carriage bolts.
    Tightened jam-nut and washer onto the new fiberglass.
    (Note to self: Jam nut and washer measure 1/4" thick. Make sure nut can be covered with filler. Use 6-8OZ glass fabric for disks. Keep the dishing as close to the deck surface as possible - don't gouge too deep.)
    Bolt ends get cut off with grinder right at the nut after assembly.
    Everything fits perfect of course, nuts are JUST below the finished surface of the deck.
    Then fill what remains of the dish by covering the nut with chopped-strand and epoxy and grind flat. Nothing shows after filling and fairing.
    The fabric disks that lap the old deck hopefully engage the tough old cabin skin of the deck composite outside with the strongback inside.*
    Nuts and washers are really on the 'outside' but just happen to be in a convenient dip that just happens to be filled in.

    That's how I shoudadunit
    __________________________________________________ ________________________________________
    * The composite has a top layer that seems to be about 3/16" to a 1/4" thick. Mid layer is 3/8" end-grain balsa. The inner layer (NOT the liner) is 1/16" or less in places. Estimate the composite generally to be 9/16" thick. The foredeck, where it was cut out for a Bomar, is exactly that. Haven't had the boat totally apart for investigation obviously, so this is general assumption - some places it's thicker.
    Last edited by ebb; 01-24-2010 at 08:48 AM.

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