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Thread: EBB's PHOTO GALLERY THREAD

  1. #181
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549

    the real diesel

    Mike,
    Keyhole slot is where a key is inserted to start the boat. Pg 9 #127

    Tank Coating is epoxyproducts.com NSP 120 / NSF 61 Approved Potable Water Epoxy. Read the MSDS.


    If anyone is prone to using this product for this use: I do not advocate the use of this product for drinking water.

    I will, after the tank is set up, and flushed a couple times, fill it with water and keep it in there for 8 weeks or so, after which I'll have it tested for the specific chemicals that might have leached from the epoxy. If something shows up I will run it thru a carbon filter and test the water again.

    I do not trust THE chemical industry nor THE regulators to come clean with the consumer. The coating is applied outside of laboratory control by an unlicensed, untrained, probably-guilty-of-something (PGOS) individual. It is best to be wary of approvals and claims and the language used to describe attributes and limitations of a product. IMCO the only approvable containment for potable water is mineral glass. Haven't found a paint-on version yet. Nearly ALL plastics have been proven many times over to be a gamble or downright dangerous. Not sure about bakelite.
    Last edited by ebb; 02-14-2005 at 05:46 PM.

  2. #182
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Portsmouth, Virginia
    Posts
    142
    Not only are these glass classics seaworthy and well built but can be customized and updated to whatever you need. Great job, you have inspired me to install/ build internal gas tanks for the outboard engine and maybe some other things for my Commander. I'm still thinking/ looking/planning on how to raise and lower the outboard motor with some mechanical contrivence. Impressive, well done.

  3. #183
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549
    Looking forward to reading of your exploits!

    Self built-in frp gas tank is a real challenge.
    Don't ever want to leak into the boat
    or into the environment.

    I have wondered at times how to go about getting them CG approved. I have wondered if I should bother at all. Might try to locate a certified tank tester. Must be live tank certifying tank testers around, right? The test would require the tank hold a certain amount of pressure for a certain length of time. I would do the air pressure test first myself - it has to be the same as the one used for new plumbing at a construction site.

    But I have a feeling that even if the tanks passed they wouldn't be approved for gas because there probably are no regs for plastic gas tank testing. No sane person would think of it!

    The only legal tanks are store bought.
    Last edited by ebb; 02-16-2005 at 07:43 PM.

  4. #184
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549

    OB Lift

    Robert,
    Have seen a photo of a rail/slide gizmo hung on a transom that caused the motor to be lifted out of the water. The OB clamped to it. So it may be a market item. Getting the motor out of the water straight up would require a whole lot of travel in the device. Now, if you could lift it up to a point and then tilt the OB that might work. But not in the Ariel well. Unless you were tempted to put a keyhole (as Mike Called it) in the transom.

    Straight up lift would require 12 to 18" (?). To cover the hole in the aft 'deck' the hutch/hatch on 338 has to clear 14" above the deck. And that's a tilted motor.

    Must be a reason why for four decades skippers have lifted a two-cycle out and laid it sideways in the Lazerette or below.

    The guy who invented the CapeHorn steering vane had a Triton. He rigged his OB on a spar that pivoted amidships off his starboard side, I think, that he lowered and raised with block and tackle at the cockpit. You may find his web site. He did some serious cruising. But what happened to the motor on a portack?
    Last edited by ebb; 02-19-2005 at 05:30 PM.

  5. #185
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    Yves Gelinas and his A30 Jean du Sud. I recomend his film about his round about. Groovy little boat too.

    www.capehorn.com

    I have to use the English site still

  6. #186
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549
    Thanks for posting Gelinas' page here. The 10 horse OB was mounted off his port quarter. Just visited real quick.

    The boat was an A30. Way to go Carl!

    His dodger instead of ss tubes had cloth/rubber ones that were kept pressurized with a pump. Collapsable in way of a comber.

    His Cape horn vanes are guranteed for one circumnavigation.

    A bon viveur with boatfuls of bons mots.

  7. #187
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    Ebb,
    Refering to post#125 on p. 9

    I have a question (go figure) After filling the gap between the cabin top and the headliner around your main ports, how stiff did that region become. If you push out on the port opening with one hand and eight inches away you pull in with your other hand, how much twist, if any, do you get?

    Also, what is the average thichness/dimention from outside cabin top to inside liner around the opening?

    Thanks, Tony

  8. #188
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,549
    HiYa Tony,
    Mine may be different from yours for a number of reasons. I would just hang out in the boat with a number of those short clean shims that come wrapped in celophane you get from the hardware. And orange handled squeeze clamps. Do every hole together til you have concensus.

    Experiment until you get the same overall thickness measured from outside to inside. I'ld bet the measurement varies from boat to boat.

    It's possible that a liner could go in a little crooked in the rush of things at the plant. That might mean that one side of the liner is closer to the cabin side than another. My guess that is pretty remote. But since the inside of the cabin and the liner were never going to be seen by anybody there might be some shortcuts taken that would make the mating of the two a little difficult. My liner was definitely WONKUS in a number of places.

    But space between liner and cabin at the windows on 338 nigh equal right and left.

    Since you are not reinstalling the original frames and you doing a version of thru bolting, you'll be able to cut each bolt exact. Therefor if you HAVE to end up with varying thickness you are out of trouble. But it would be so much easier if all your bolts could be the same length. And that means the deadlight holes have to be the same thickness all around.

    The liner is also bent out of shape:
    at the compression beam
    under the deck
    around the companion way
    and wherever there are fastenings for rails and gear.
    "TWIST" must be a relative thing. I wouln't push anything into an unnatural shape. Wouldn't you think that the original mold for the liner was made very fair? And you'ld think the unseen inside of the cabin would be pretty clean and fair too.

    The cabin IS fair, that narrow section between the holes should be absolute fair with the outside of the cabin. It has to be to mount the deadlight frames. The 'cheating' came by squeezing the relatively bendy liner. Maybe you can clamp a temporary strongback to the outside, and see if you can open a space in that skinny piece of center liner to the space you have decided on, without deflecting the outside cabin piece. Sight along the outside to see if is fair - bend a batten over it to see if something has been bent out of fair over time.

    If that LINER center piece won't comply, it could be cut and 'repaired' with all the epoxy and cabosil you are going to stuff in there.

    Would guess that to come up with the deadlights Pearson has designed there that the space was assumed to be constant all around each of the 4 frames. HAD to be, the inner frame machine screws all screwed into deadend holes. Therefor the space had to be the same all round. The liner had to be beautifully fair when made Then the guys had to crank it into submission. Over time it has maybe taken a set. But I believe the cabin itself has never twisted, except that there skinny piece between the front window and the back window. MAYBE!

    Will come back from the boat with the thickness I came up with. Should say the boat came up with it. But I felt we just were doing the equalizing that bloody Pearson should have done in the first place. I'll let you know. Long winded ebb.

    {Strength? I'll have to bang and see. The filled center section shows very little deflection when hit. It's amazing how stiff the sides became even with the gaping holes. The sides are mildly curved, sculpted. The convex curves of the cabin add a lot of strength. The relatively narrow original frames follow these mild curves well but not the glass. Applying 3/8 or 1/2" lexan to the outside and thru bolting thru epoxy filled sides will provide your cabin with unbelievable 360 roll over green water tsunami comber strength.}
    Last edited by ebb; 01-20-2012 at 09:43 AM.

  9. #189
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,252

    Hard Dodger Example

    Hey Ebb, here's a Cal 25 sporting a hard dodger similar to what I understand you are planning . . .
    Attached Images  

  10. #190
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
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    2,252
    How about a close-up?
    Attached Images  

  11. #191
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,549

    In this hard dodger

    the juxtaposition of circular deadlights with the angular is particularly gratifying. The designer, obviously with safety in mind, has kept the openings quite conservative in the event of boarding seas. Hard edges and flat planes will cut any comber to pieces thereby shrugging off and canceling the weight of the water.

    The multi-purpose flat top will be useful for solar panels, sunbatheing or keeping a goat tethered. Clever use of WWII mindsweeper grey is in keeping with the whole nautical theme. And the crawl-thru entrance with its centrally located recessed latch is curious - but safe, no doubt - as is the paucity of dangerous vents. Everyone has his own limits. All in all an interesting effort!

  12. #192
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Hampton Roads Va.
    Posts
    821

    Thumbs down Boat Porn

    Hey Bill, Enough of this boat porn ! 1st Commander Pete and now you when will it stop . I doubt if even one of Pete's gals would make that boat look good .

  13. #193
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    If you're gonna do it, do it right.
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  14. #194
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    Is it having a baby..?

  15. #195
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Portsmouth, Virginia
    Posts
    142
    As a kid we had a double ended steel lifeboat painted black and gray. It was about an ugly a boat as you could want;however, we had more fun motering up and down the Delaware River and Bay. I bet the owner of the sail boat pictured thinks it beautiful,looks like its used alot. I must have bad eyes or am having somekind of 60's flashback but are there really two identical boats pictured above, who would make such things and what are they used for? At first I thought they were some mass production pleasure craft for patriotic workers from the old Soviet Union or East Germany untill I took notice of the American auto.
    Last edited by Robert Lemasters; 03-19-2005 at 11:30 AM.

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