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Thread: EBB's PHOTO GALLERY THREAD

  1. #136
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    Here's a f/u on some earlier photos of the new forward hatches. #338 now has two (2).
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  2. #137
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    The really cool part is the view of the hatches from below showing the custom trim.
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  3. #138
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    And the other one . . .
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  4. #139
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    It's not possible for me to remember everything Ebb said about these projects. In fact, I probably did not understand what he was talking about

    I do know that he's found a very inexpensive epoxy product from a reputable mfg. $50/gal. If interested, send him an E-mail. (Go to Ebb's profile and click on "send Ebb an E-mail.") If you know the password, I'm sure he will share.

  5. #140
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    Gentlemen,
    the epoxy product is a two-part high-build sanding primer at $45 a gallon from an independant chandlery. Everybody uses it in the yard here, the DIYers after they talk with the pros - who can't afford failures. It is supplied in half filled gallon containers, as a one to one mix. Each part requires stirring befor mixing. Because of the half empty cans it is convenient to mix and pour into the premeasured mixing container.

    A high build sanding primer does not have to be part of a LPU system like Awlgrip or Sterling. You can put it on, prep at your 'leisure', and then put on the requisite regular system primer when you're going to paint within the time constrictions of the film.

    I know Dave and Mike have worked with this stuff. The chandlery stocks it for the workers. In fact the c. has a truck that makes daily deliveries all over the Bay area to marinas and job sites. This kind of personal service the Royal Rip Off Chain can't duplicate. The paint company what makes it does not seem to promote the product in any way, maybe to avoid stepping on the toes of USPaint and Sterling etc. who flog it at twice the price. The white stuff you see in the OB well pics of Billl's is this primer. It also comes in "champagne" in case you need a color to sand down to. Like most epoxys it gets harder over time. I've probably passed the easy sanding window in the well. Oh, well! email and I'll give up the product name and number.

    This way I hope I am honoring the 'underground' informational nature of this primer. I would hope that you guys do the same, leaving it word of mouth, and not broadcasting it here on the net. It probably is just me inventing the secret status of this paint. I can here Dave saying, "Hell, man, EVERYBODY knows this stuff, bin using it myself for twennyfive years or so! Primed a dulcimer once with it!"

    I've seen this used for topsides only. I think it is best sprayed on. (haven't done it myself, yet) because it goes on very even and smooth that way. Afterall, the hi-build is put on to fill pin holes and minor imperfections in all that hard work of fairing. My brush marks in the ob well are there now exactly as I put them on wet.
    If you need a high build hull primer as a barrier coat, people around here use Interbucks 2000.

    A yard is full of toxins. The high end LPU gloss man here does not prewash hulls with solvents, as specified by most systems specs I've seen, uses only soap (detergent like for dishes) and water.
    Last edited by ebb; 07-23-2004 at 05:31 PM.

  6. #141
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    Ebb! She looks fantastic. The work is nothing short phenomenal, and that's what we really expect from you now. The outboard well looks smooooth and fine. I'd be happy to clean grunge there. Yeah, the trim on the hatches is the only way to do it. Right and right on. It really is a pleasure to watch the refit of 338.
    I'm still waiting for you to show up in good ol' Minnesota

  7. #142
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    Thanks, Tony!
    And howz the Dream Weaver coming along? I seem to rip-van-winkle these days waking up to old news: you have to be brewing hot cocoa for the crew in the new galley by now on those frosty summer mornings up at the Lake. Right?

  8. #143
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    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
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    Genius


    ...
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    Last edited by commanderpete; 09-09-2006 at 04:27 PM.

  9. #144
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    geewillikers C'pete!
    an autographed pic of Al hisself at the helm - fabulous!

    This reminds me of an incident which occured sometime in yhe early '70's. Must have gone up to the University for a lecture of Bucky Fuller's when I was living in Berkeley. Sat up close, but my distinct impression was that I was sitting in the back row of the auditorium - I don't think I got anything he synergized. But I was inspired.

    I had made a balsa dish using geodesic triangles for 'framing' and added three triangular section pontoons to the convex side of the model and of course a dowel mast and bedsheet sails. Took it down to the pond by the freeway to give it a test. It was probably 18" round (ie a scale model of a 36 footer) and elongated by the pontoons, It immediately got blown flat. Introduced a couple of bricks that just happened to be right there by the shore into the middle (I think I had some kind of deck on it, you know, that held the mast up and all and a rudder.) With cargo in the hold it took off like a bat out of hell across the water to the opposite shore in about 5 seconds.

    I was elated and somehow wrote a letter to the great man. Who very kindly wrote back (can't imagine the volumn of mail he ordinaryly must have received!) including a picture of his sailboat. I've misfilled it, but remember it was one of those headlong international racers of the time, or maybe earlier, made of wood with enormous sails. That was the extent of my involvement with a homegrown genius. Nothing ever came of the geodesic sailboat. Gave it to a kid. Bucky seemed more interested in his day sailer, and I went on to mess around with a wooden plumb-bowed gaff rig retro design from the turn of the century. Almost set fire to the boat learning about polyester. 10 beers befor I retell That story.
    Last edited by ebb; 07-27-2004 at 08:24 AM.

  10. #145
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    On the Motor Well series

    I realize that only the most curious will want to cross ref back to the photos, but here goes:

    1st photo -
    OB in operating position. The width of the well is the exact turning radius of the shaft, plus a little extra aft clearamce for removing the motor from the lazarette.

    2nd -
    Shows the clamp of the Yamaha 8/4 with the power tilt arm as it is situated behind the dam which provides the form for the plug. The plug can be used only when the motor is up. And when the motor is removed. No plug is in this view.

    3rd -
    The motor is up, the plug is in place. This cockpit view shows that the plug has an integral lid that conforms to the curve of the dam, fits flat to the ledge that defines the shape of the opening and fits snug in the apparent square of this mid part of the well.

    4th -
    Shows the clamping board and the OB clamp behind the curve of the opening. There will be a drain or two in this dammed up area, but needs a oneway scupper not found yet.
    The initial curve between the clamp and the shaft was determined with paper pattern, then translated into frp about 1/8' thick over a little form.
    The actual hole shape with its sloping sides was a little more dicey. Was made using special bending ply that required happy luck with the fitting and some release tape inside and the usual build up with mat and juice. Even tho it gets thin in the middle, it is very strong.

    5 & 6 -
    The shield shape of the plug is the outside surface of the boat. It was made using the hole formed above as the mold, with a piece of aquaply covered with mat added later in the process as the lid. The shape again was molded with xmat and filled with pieces of pvc foam.

    ( Discovered that the lovely crease that extends up to the transom from the top of the rudder (absent in the OB Ariel) could found by epoxying on two carefully shaped pieces of homemade 1/8" frp sheet that met in the middle where the crease was supposed to be. It closed the whole bottom including the remains of the original well. Not having seen this crease except on a Triton where it is a smidgeon over emphasized, I pushed the temporary 'plates' with 1 X 2s to the ground until it looked curvey and let it set. I filled in the plug from the top and got it mostly flat with the edges of the hole. To release the mold I grinded away the 'plates' underneath untill I saw the edge of the release tape, Since I cheated and used only double=sided carpet tape with the peeler left on, two layers, it was so tight I had to use a carjack to push it up into the well. All the temporary sheet ended up ground off. except maybe a little that remained as the bottom of the plug. The bottom was filled and longboarded with the plug in place.)

    Photo 7 -
    This is the starboard web frame that forms the side of the well and ties the aft bit of the deck into the lazarette. Because of the high cut in the transom for the tilting saildrive the split backstay plates will be mounted at the ends of the toerail on the transom.
    You are also looking at the corner of the starboard gas tank which for the most part uses what used to be the old gas can deck and foam. I'm waiting to be castigated for this installation. But the exposed parts of the tanks are 5/16s to 3/8" thick.

    This ends the series. I hope to convince Bill to herein post a fisheye view of the plug in place using a snap shot of mine. Hope this is useful.
    Last edited by ebb; 07-29-2004 at 08:33 PM.

  11. #146
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    MIDDLEBURY VT
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    Thumbs up EBBS RESTORATION

    JUST GOT BACK FROM ANOTHER FINE SAIL ON LAKE CHAMPLAIN
    AND JUST LOOKED AT THIS THREAD IN ITS ENTIRETY

    I AM IN AWE OF EBBS WORK

    I AM REAL GLAD I DONT HAVE TO DO THIS AMOUNT OF WORK YET

    DOES EBB HAVE A REGULAR JOB??

    AND WHEN IS THE LAUNCH DATE???

    IF IM EVER IN CALIFORNIA I GOTT SEE HIS BOAT

    ICEMAN

  12. #147
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    PLASTIC MAN FOUND

    ebb will be found one day aboard his little ship preserved in what experts will believe to be an organic compound called epoxy. The forensictechs will be astounded to discover his Nicholson 49 in its bucket scabbard, and evidence of imported water and delifude in his colon, which proves he had contact with commercial food giants. Studies will show his veins contained a liquid composed of grains and herbs believed to be called 'beveridge.'
    Lung tissue will reveal copper particles and silicon fibers and a hundred other exotic compounds. Scientists will assume the specimin was forced to spend his life climbing in and out of what they believe is a prime example of "restoration" for which they will find no known purpose.


    Gene, Bill, thanks for a soul stirring day on the Bay!
    Last edited by ebb; 08-02-2004 at 08:11 AM.

  13. #148
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    Ebb!
    B-day?...You?...Cheers!

  14. #149
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    Due to overwhelming demand, we are presenting the next series of photos to show how Ebb created the OB Well Plug.

    Step #1, As described elsewhere, two temporary frp sheets were glued to the bottom of the hole delineating the crease that runs between the rudder and the transom. Then the plug shape was molded in with 2 layers of xmat on the sides, more on the bottom to allow for possible fairing. White strips are carpet tape with peeler left on. Plug was glued to the temporary sheets which were then ground off.
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  15. #150
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    Step #2, shows the plug being filled with pvc foam and gel.
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