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Thread: Outboard Discussions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Richmond VA
    Posts
    16

    Talking Outboard Discussions

    Went out about a month ago and that *@$#!~& old outboard refused to start for the trip back in--had to call TowBoat US and everything. So I broke down and bought a brand new electric start Mercury 9.9. Just finished installing the key start and the new starter/deep cycle battery that I chose.

    Haven't had a chance to try it out yet--the East Coast low that effected NY made this last wknd a bummer here too(we had 40 kt gusts and 6-8 ft waves on the Ches. Bay). But I have started the motor and I've given my dock lines a good thorough stretching.

    Well. I hope this weekend will give me a chance to get out of the slip and burn up that 25:1 break-in gas! ;p

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Castine, ME
    Posts
    9

    engines

    I am glad the new engine works well. I am running a 1981 Envirude 9.9, which pushes the boat quiet well. But the block weights about 100 pounds and swamps the well. How much does your engine weight, ? I have heard of a nissan 9.9 that is about 60#s.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Richmond VA
    Posts
    16
    My Mercury is 74#'s The last one that I had was 85# and I definately would get water in the lazerette when sailing, but mostly because of the heeling of the boat. Once the boat was level, the lazerette water would drain back out. I have only been sailing w/ the new motor once and did not notice the water filling the lazeratte, but I was not heeled very much.

  4. #4
    PaulRoth Guest

    Outboard

    I've only had my Ariel (number 3 hundred something) for a couple of years, and it's the first sailboat I've ever owned. The engine is a 7 or 8 hp evinrude. The whole bottom end is about corroded away (the fins are almost gone) but the motor still runs fine. Also the engine doesn't seem to have a lot of effect when trying to back up.

    Does anyone know how to repair or at lease stop the corrosion (I take it there should be an anode somewhere), and any advice on maybe a better engine, or something I'm doing wrong would be great.

    Thanks

    Paul Roth

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Hampton Roads Va.
    Posts
    821
    Dont leave it in the water when you are not using it . You can get a lower unit housing to replace the old one .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    39

    Outboard motor

    I replaced the outboard on my B27 last fall. I had an old 2 stroke Evinrude 9.9 HP longshaft. I couldn't get it to run consistently and it left me in some very bad situations. I ended up replacing it with a new 4 stroke Nissan 5 HP long shaft. Cost me $1100 at BoatUS. Some feel that's not enough power for the boat, but it moves me along just fine (4 knots @ half throttle in calm water). Folks warned me it wouldn't be enough in bad weather, and that's partly true, I suppose. During last years Good Old Boat regatta, I kept up with the Triton fleet (A4s) heading out to the start line into a 20 kt headwind. Next day, though, near my own marina after a somewhat scary 25 mile sail, I couldn't make more than a knot or so into 35-40 kt winds under the motor alone and had to motorsail.

    I went with the smaller motor because I wanted a 4 stroke but wanted to keep the weight down in the lazarette (B27s tend to squat with two much weight back there). I think its a fair compromise for the low price, excellent fuel economy, quiet operation, and through prop exhaust (no more stinky cockpit and can leave the lazarette hatch down). I figure lots of people have gone around the world without any motor at all, so I should be OK on the Chesapeake with something less than the recommended 10 HP.

    Soooo, the point of that long diatribe is that the 4 stroke 5 HP Nissan is a good motor at a good price, and would probably do just fine on your Ariel.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,242
    Fox makes good sense. Keep it light at the stern of the Ariel/Commander. It also makes it easier to R & R the engine. Less chance of doing damage to yourself

    MaiKa'i runs a 5 HP Merc two stroke. Plenty of power for most conditions. An 8 HP Nissan / Yamaha 2 cycle, however, is still pretty light (60 lbs?) and will give you the max appropriate horsepower. Someone figured 8 HP was equivilent to a 160% Genoa.

    The Nissan / Yamaha / Merc 5 HP four cycle is still small enough to fit in the engine well. Hondas and other four cycle engines over 4 HP will not fit without a lot of modification to the boat. And, they weigh a ton.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Tampa Bay, Florida
    Posts
    7

    Outboard

    I purchased a Nissan 9.8 HP two stroke last year. This engine fits nicely in the lazerette and is light enough to lift and store in the lazerette also. A good price and plenty of power too. Always starts on the first or second pull which is a far cry from my old Evinrude 9.9 which was very unreliable.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Walnut Creek, CA
    Posts
    136

    outboard

    I have a 7 hp Merc on my Ariel it just fits. Maybe a 2 stoke...? oil has to be mixed with the gas. I can lift it out without to much trouble and store it in the compartment when not in use. Runs well, power seem enough, backing up is not the best, but saved me when I gunned it from going into the back of another boat, when I misjudged a solo docking effort against the tide. I have to work on the backing up part. Drifts/pulls to one side more.

    I picked up a big paddle as a back for emergency, do not know if it will help , and hope not to find out :-)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    I've got a Yamaha 8hp two stroke ("The one-pull wonder") Never use the electric start.

    To compensate for "prop walk" to port while backing I just swivel the engine to starboard.

    I think docking would be real ugly at times if I couldn't swivel the engine.

    Seems to me there must be some bad electrical activity going on in or around your boat to eat up an engine that much, even if it didnt have a zinc. Might also want to check the thru hulls

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Walnut Creek, CA
    Posts
    136

    Outboard

    "swivel the engine to starboard"

    Wow, great , I'll have to try that. I do not have much room to move the throdle, but I'll give that a try, maybe even a small amount will help.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Walnut Creek, CA
    Posts
    136

    outboard

    Hmmm, swivel the prop toward starboard or the handle???

    inquiring minds...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,242
    Try installing the ob with the throttle handle in the vertical position. It will bend back far enough to allow closing the hatch. With the throttle handle out of the way, the engine will swivel from stop to stop. In fact, you can swivel it by just getting a grip on the head of the engine and twisting it left or right. Faster than reaching throught the opening in the lazarette bulkhead and trying to use the handle.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Asst. Vice Commodore, NorthEast Fleet, Commander Division (Ret.) Brightwaters, N.Y.
    Posts
    1,823
    I had a Merc outboard on my first Commander quite a few years ago. I remember the throttle arm was a problem. The arm would only go up or forward. There was no room for it to go forward and I couldnt close the hatch. I had to unbolt the arm, stick the arm through the opening from the lazarette to the cockpit, and retighten the arm. Then I could only swivel the engine in one direction. Not so good.

    Boats generally back up to port because of the direction the prop turns.

    I swivel the engine so the prop is on the starboard side to compensate while backing.

    I always got confused as to which way to point the rudder while backing. I finally decided the rudder has little effect anyway since it is in front of the prop of the outboard. I just try to keep the rudder straight. Not so easy because when you start to back up the rudder wants to slam hard over because of the force of the water on it.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Walnut Creek, CA
    Posts
    136

    backing

    Oh cool!
    It is suppose to be in the mid to high 70's here this weekend. I will be able to do a backing test, as I head to try out my new headsail. 1st sail of the season!

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