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Thread: The oft discussed outboard extra ballast revealed

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Orinda, CA
    Posts
    31
    Thanks Rico, Ebb, for your helpful responses.

    Ebb, I will send you a PM. What is Elizabeth Muir, another boat of yours?

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Excelsior, Minnesota
    Posts
    323

    So... how does she handle?

    I have had the opportunity to sail The Princess a couple of times now after the compensator lead's removal.
    The boat accelerates noticeably better in puffs & she is much more tender between 0 - 25 degrees of heel but stiffens right up like she always has when the rubrail starts to get wet.
    Both times I have been out Its been blowing around 10mph and have been under full main and 150% genoa.
    I'll report in next time I sail her in the 15-20 range.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,520

    Elizqabeth Muir

    Built through out the '80s at Ed Letter's yard in Bolinas. Launched 1991 in Sausalito. An Eldridge-McInnis knockabout Schooner of 48'.
    WoodenBoat called it a masterpiece (an understatement) and in '92 put it on their cover.
    It was built under the direction of master shipwright John Linderman for and with Babe Lamerdine, a woodcarver and master craftman himself. Remember it was lofted vertically outside under the shed Ed Letter built.
    Many local craftsmen contributed to its building, from the laying of its keel, casting its ballast, steaming and fitting of its ribs, carvel planking... to its rudder, cabin and spars.
    Rigged by Kit Africa.

    In the decade of weekends it took, hundreds of visitors showed up, including Babe's old sailing buddies, and clients.
    He obviously was special to a whole lot of people. I believe that all the help was volunteered and all of it seemed to be aimed at making sure Babe finally got the boat he had always dreamed of.

    google> Cruising Sailor . View topic - ELIZABETH MUIR 48 foot wood...
    Last edited by ebb; 04-10-2010 at 10:39 AM.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Orinda, CA
    Posts
    31
    Thanks Ebb. She is stunning.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    grand rapids mi
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by ebb View Post
    I have a number of reclaimed/recycled lead pigs.
    They are more or less 34" long
    5.5" wide
    and 2" deep.
    Semi-circular in section. The lead was cast into split halves of iron pipe from lead-clad wire along the Coast Hiway. Same lead used in the ballast of the Elizabeth Muir.
    Approximately 135# each.
    Quick and easy molds for those interested in making their own is to weld end plates to angle iron,(they also form the legs) and use them as the molds. Advantage is that you get triangular shaped pigs, which stack together more densely so they take up less space for the same weight.

    I don't have a problem with heeling, but my wife and some regular guests don't care for it, so I plan to keep the original pigs aboard, along with a few trim pieces.

    Ken.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Excelsior, Minnesota
    Posts
    323
    I have now sailed The Princess in the 15 - 20 wind range and she is a changed girl. She is not the stiff old girl she was and is definitely over powered with the 150% in that range. I don't think I would recommend pulling out the compensator ballast to you San Francisco Bay fellas or others on big water and in big wind. I'm still deciding if I like the change and will wait to add some weight back in with another battery bank until I settle on a new sail plan.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Brooksville, FL
    Posts
    714
    Mike

    Thank you very much for letting us know that. As you know I was contemplating going with the LFP batteries that would have only weighed about 200 lbs but I have made a decision to go back to my original plan for the Odyssey PC1800 battery for two reasons. One I will get significantly more range on a charge for a significantly lower cost and two, the weight of the PC1800 battery bank will be equal to the 500 lb added ballast pig so when I remove it I will be back to where I started with total weight. The only differance will be that the weight will be a little higher in the hull.
    JERRY CARPENTER - C147
    A man can succeed at almost anything for which he has unlimited enthusiam.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    107

    600 LB Adjustment

    I removed the corrector weight today. Not too difficult although I was worried the lag eye I installed to lift it would pull out. As soon as I got the piece upright I tied a couple of safety lines around it and pulled it out of the boat. We'll see how the boat behaves without the additional ballast. I opened up the floorboard to make the removal easier.

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  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    12
    My Ariel had the atomic 4 removed, and has an outboard in the well. The prop shaft is still there and can spin....I have not removed it. Perhaps adding pigs would help her be less tender? Also, does anyone else have a pig in the bow? One of the previous owners put a large one in the bow and encapsulated it with foam. Perhaps to offset the weight of the outboard, but is seems to me this would increase the hobby horse effect, and she has it for sure.

    Any ideas?

    I do not have the budget to re power her with an inboard....and I find the 8 HP to still not be enough when fighting a current, and the 6 HP tohatsu sail pro was dangerously underpowered in my opinion....nowhere near hull speed.

    Anyone try to fit a 9.9 high thrust?

    Thanks!

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