+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 42 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 619

Thread: Fruits Of My Labor (A-113)

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,546

    Resp-O-Rater

    From the Penn State Industries catalog, I quote:
    "Ideal for wood dust! This patented product uses a snorkel-like mouthpiece for breathing. One size fits all and avoids the "beard problem." Air is filtered from the rear with a .3 micron filter media and is exhausted downward from your face and avoids fogging glasses or goggles, The air tubes sit comfortably on your shoulders, are light weight and are positioned to the rear to breathe fresh air. A nose clip is included to avoid breathing dust ladened air. Includes filters."

    What the photo shows is a guy chomping down on a yellow mouth piece, a tube angled straight down on his chin and the air intake tubes going back at his jaw line ending in a bugle shape that must be the filter. He is wearing goggles way up on the top of his nose, about as far away from a respirator as you can imagine. I wear a front valved 3M dust mask usually that goes over mouth and nose plus glasses and goggles. Always fogged up even when I purposefully breath in thru the nose and blow out thru the mouth.

    Imagine there's nothing like a fullface mask with airflow down the face from an airpump somewhere out in the clean air. Or there is a slightly cheaper one where you wear the pump and filter on the waist. Hundreds. This new thing might be a decent compromise at $45, filters $8, mouthpieces $4. Might get some agression out on the pacifyer effect of the mouthpiece and implant a sunny image of diving one day on a bahamian reef in warm crystal clear waters. Grindon mcduff!
    Last edited by ebb; 09-05-2003 at 07:18 PM.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    290
    Ebb,

    My new floor circa February. That Black ---- er, stuff holding down the old 1/4" fancy plywood was a real challenge to get off. The nails were just as hard to deal with as the aformentioned black hardened rubbery goo. I had to reglass the top of the 3/4" deck before putting on the new teak and holly. Save your pennies because the new 4X8 sheet of T and H really put a dent in my wallet. Found only one place in Houston to get it.
    Attached Images  
    Kent

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,546

    black rubber sole

    Capt. Kent,
    Can only hope what I began in a fit of pique,
    will end up as nice as your deck of teak!

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    Ebb
    We're not really sure what is going in the bilge yet. Ideas have ranged from water tank, fuel tank(Aussie Geoff), sealed battery box(box and battery),sealed storage, cold storage...certainly something more than just a bilge pump or two. Mr. Baldwin, and others, have dropped in some nice storage here.
    Yes I have toyed with the idea of just a compression post in the center or just off center hidden in a bulkhead enabling me to enclose the head forward. I just couldn't find enough room to make it agreeable though. That and the fact that you'd have to step on the hull go forward which might be tricky with a little heeling. I think that works best on beamy hulls(Commanders excluded of course). But I definitely will widen the passage way through the bulkhead. I was forever catching or scraping something on the old one!
    Funny you should mention respirators. I was just shopping for a full face jobby that could run in either negative or positive pressure mode. All of this grinding is steaming up my glasses and because I have so much of it left to do on this boat and then another boat to start after this one I'm thinking maybe an upgrade isn't such a selfish idea.
    Anyway this is the neat part...
    Attached Images  

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    When I was cleaning up some of the dust I ran across this little relic. It's a pencil line one of the workers at pearson had drawn on the hull to mark the bulkhead location. I like this kind of stuff.
    Attached Images  

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,546
    well I'll be... ... ...
    don't think they gave out pencils to the guy who pasted 338 together!
    (Actually, Pearson had one pencil and it wore out by the time they got to 338!)
    did find a word with an arrow
    embeded in the laminate
    (you could only see it when the sun shone thru)
    on the forward port coach roof pointing to the little opening port
    - it said "window"
    Last edited by ebb; 09-08-2003 at 07:14 AM.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    'Worked late last night, woke late today, went out to the boat to find this...
    Attached Images  

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    ...and this !
    Attached Images  

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Baileys Harbor, WI
    Posts
    24
    Tony,

    Are you going to leave the cabin liner intact? It appears to be just about the only thing left inside. I have wondered what is under there, you know, what would happen if I just took it out. It doesn't fit all that closely...at least in 105 it doesn't. Might make port light replacement a little lbit easier without it. Jus' wonderin'.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,546
    Pretty impressive prep work there!
    How many of us know what a rotton job it is,
    and how much you got to love that boat.
    Has any Ariel/Commander been this nude inside
    since Pearson put them together?

    Greg, punch in 'cabin liner' on the SEARCH button to read up on discussions historical.

    It would take a lot of troweling and fairing to get something close to the liner's original finish. It would have to be fair for any added fabric/foam headliner to look good. If you wanted a wood strip roof. I would first consider taking just the part of the molded liner off that would be replaced.

    Jim Baldwin's method of rebuilding his windows used the coach sides and the liner separation (1/4 to 3/8" space) filled with epoxy gel. This must add considerable rigidity to the sides and the installation. I'm just about to do a version of this myself. Baldwin then floated in lexan and used the original aluminum frames as clamps by thru bolting. He's circumnavigated his Triton twice. To me this is a perfect upgrade, adding a lot of strength to the windows and the coach sides - without having to add clunky framing inside and out.

    The dead air space between the two moldings must add insulation.
    Any thru-holes will have to be done in the predrill oversize, fill, and drill again method to make sure no water gets in between. And, ofcourse this method creates standoffs so that when you tighten a fastening you won't distort the liner.

    Liners have permanent distortions in them now, but after yon fill and sand the upgrades I think I would finish off with a light colored satin paint, so the wobbles won't show. If one was really pickey judicious drill and fill might be used to straighten the liner! But who's that nuts?

    Proposed nutcake liner fairing method:

    [I'ld drill a hole where the liner had to be pushed out or drawn in. I'ld use a panhead screw to mechanically and temporarily push or pull the liner. I'd drill another hole close by, probably larger, and squirt in gel using the big two ounce syringe. When set, and glued, back out the adjusting screw. I'ld do this from outside. After the liner was set, fill in all the other holes with the syringe I'ld have a bunch of these fills to do at the same time. The liner would become rock solid.]
    Last edited by ebb; 09-12-2003 at 10:35 AM.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099
    Greg
    The cabin liner will remain a resident, though, like yours I suspect, it doesn't fit that snug to the cabin top. That loose fit was the cause of much distress to me early on before I discovered the soft, flakey plywood at the base of the main bulkhead. Now it just lends to the character of 113 This liner currently has alot of holes in it and in the end will have a alot of new ones in it from hardware and such. It would be nice to have a clean, continuous headliner in the main cabin not accented by acorn nuts. As to what's under there, I cut some large oval shaped holes in the cavities behind the port and starboard nav lights on the side of the cabin top so I could lay in some fabric and matting to close up the holes left by said light removal. That was the best look I've had at the underside of the cabin top. It appears to be of the same texture and quality as the v-berth area. Keep in mind that I've only seen an area about 40 square inches. I think removing the cabin liner could be a bit of a bear when you get to the underside of the deck where they attach to each other. I'd probably cut it out in sections taking the areas where it floats freely first and then work back to the points of attachment. Those 24 grit sanding(butchering) discs are efficient at fiberglass removal.
    Just as an aside-make first couple of pieces of equipment you buy a good respirator and goggles before so much as sanding off some paint.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099

    Imprinting

    General call for imput here. Shortly after bringing 113 home I notices what looked to be a long, nasty repair job on the port side of her hull. Given the location I guessed someone took a glancing blow somewhere along the line and who really cares now because she had been repaired (less than flawlessly) so you wouldn't notice it twenty feet away. Then one day I happened to notice a scar on the starboard side too! In the process of taking some pretty thorough measurements before starting my chop job it became apparent that those 'scars' were directly behind the stringers that run for and aft through the main cabin. Imprinting! My dangerous little mind thought.
    Digging around for information I've found gobs of it out there. Opinions Galore (remember that James Bond movie?) but I want to know what this group's members think. I spent the morning working with some dense, rigid material that I would call styrofoam but who really knows what the stuff is called now. It doesn't crush more than 1/32"(ish) under my full weight with a 3/4" edge riding on it and later today I'll give it the epoxy resin melt test.
    Please give freely and liberally, your opinions.
    Tony G
    Attached Images  

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
    Posts
    1,099

    course number one

    Here's a rough idea in case any of you were wondering...
    Attached Images  
    Last edited by Tony G; 09-16-2003 at 08:06 AM.

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    3,546

    Opinion # 67209

    Well, Cappy, it's like this:
    Noticed these same shadowy indent on 338 also. Certainly not scars! You can see them if the light is just right, but it's easier to feel them on 338.

    Let's take those stringers: they are 1 1/2" wide, not 3/4", with a bunch of poly and mat tabbing them on. They are not under load like a bulkhead yet they've telegraphed thru the hull somehow.

    I have not read any literature on this phenomenon.

    The imprinting you read about is what happens when you place a hard edge against a thin, THIN, 'engineered' modern hull. You would put in a pillow to spread the load with filleting and tabbing, suspending the sharp edge of the bulkhead off the hull.

    IMCO, you don't have to do this on the Ariel. If you think your old stringers, described above are imprinting then you better put in 10 inch wide styrofoam between the bulkhead and the hull. Correct?

    338 has and will have all its plywood bulkheads put in dry, with large, 1 1/2" fillets (90 degree radius fillets take very little gel.) Then on major bulkheads two or three layers of mat with the narrowest put in first. This I believe widens the loads out even more. And the HOLD on the hull can be spread out as wide as you make your tabbing. At the compression bulkhead I would tab over the fillet 4", then 8", 12", 18". Well., something like that.

    What arguement could there possible be that if both sides are done this way that anything is going to move? Maybe the boat will shrink! And thereby reveal the bulkhead?

    Suspended bulkhead on foam? The upward pull of your upper shrouds is going to be opposed by your tabbing which is spread fairly wide on your hull. Maybe that's ok. Maybe I'ld add more tabbing.

    If I remember 338's stringer imprint on the hull outside is slightly holloiw, ie there are two mini ridges. Of course the hull is thinner up there, and the imprint is lengthwise. Maybe the hulls weren't cured all the way when they added these things when they made them.

    Would very much like to read anything on the subject of fiberglass boats changing shape, shrinking, becoming brittle (not gelcoat.) pre-OPEC oil crises (1973.) We get surface delamination from sun and heat, but shape-changing so that pasted on interior pieces would 'imprint'? On the Ariel, I don't think so.

    What they did: they slapped the stringers on loaded with extra hot catylist. Braced them up with spring battens and let them smoke. On a not yet totally cured hull, That might cause distortion. I think it all happened at the factory. ARGUEMENTS?
    Last edited by ebb; 09-16-2003 at 04:07 PM.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Bellingham, Wa.
    Posts
    173
    FWIW, Commander #280 has aa pair (one per side) of indentations similar to those described wight where the stringers for the v-berth shelves go.
    Dave

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts