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Thread: Fruits Of My Labor (A-113)

  1. #16
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    Oct 2001
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    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
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    132
    Where the icebox used to be...
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  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
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    And the counter...

    Next time I will reduce the resolution so I can get it all in with fewer shots. I had to crop these to make the upload restriction.
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  3. #18
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    more beer!

    We be fools or heros or lovers of impossible women.

  4. #19
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Hampton Roads Va.
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    821
    Make mine a Pale India Ale , a Sierra Nevada will do just fine . It has been the lubricant for boat builders for eons .

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
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    132

    I'll drink to that

    I know I'm the latter...




    Found these quotes at http://www.latitude38.com/wisdom.htm

    "To furnish a wife will cost you much trouble,
    But to fit-out a ship the expenses are double."
    --W.H.Tillman

    "The man who would be fully employed should procure a ship or a woman, for no two things produce more trouble" - Plautus 254-184 B.C.

  6. #21
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    Sep 2001
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    Northern MN
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    Brent
    Doesn't that just give you a rewarding feeling? Buy a boat-take a boat apart. Have you any plans yet on what's going back in? I'm curious as to what others deem necesary accomodations below. Trying to come up with a layout that will allow two people to stay out of each others way in 25' may take a try or two. I think the cockpit will get factored in the equation somehow. 113 will essentially become our weekend get away after we put her in. No phones, no lights, no motor cars...

  7. #22
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    Sep 2001
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    Northern MN
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    New mast?

    Ebb
    While reading your piece in the latest newsletter regarding strongbacks I noticed the photo of your strongback out of boat. Is that your mast with the tapered spreaders or just a handy bench? Also, just in case Bill's photos don't elucidate all, where you puttin' yer MSD? Glad you brought up the point of the stem being so thin. I hadn't planed on doing anything there but then again I didn't plan on buying the last two boats either!

  8. #23
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    Oct 2001
    Location
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
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    Tony,

    That was the plan from the begining. For years I've been itching to build a boat, but my wife proclaimed that she was not stepping into anything that I built

    So, after some deliberation, we agreed that I could get my "fix" by working on a fiberglass boat, and she would know that it was built by a professional (although you know what they say about the Ark and the Titanic)

    The plan for #66 is similar to yours--a weekend getaway without cars, phones, TV, etc. Of course, mine is a little bit more ambitious, as there are the three children (ages 12, 9 and 4) in addition to the wife.

    The forward cabinets are not coming back. I cannot see much use for them--except to collect junk--and my wife is a bit claustrophobic, so having more space inside will make her more comfortable. The extra length on the berths will help to accomodate us all too. Also, there was an article in Good Old Boat last year that described how one boatowner put slats between the two quarterberths to make one large bed.

    The icebox is being replaced with this puppy. Notice the advertisement about keeping ice for 5 days. I'll be testing that this week. If it can keep ice for 3, I'll be happy. It is going under the companionway. The way I see it, I can pack this at home--once--and use it all weekend. Much easier than packing a cooler, then a built-in icebox, and then unpacking the icebox, repacking the cooler and unpacking the cooler back at home...

    The galley will essentially be one long countertop across the beam, with a sink in there somewhere, stops for a camp stove (although I'm planning on a rail-mounted grill for most of the cooking) and space under for storing it and other necessities.

    I'm trying to figure out some way of getting a full-size chart table in as well (it will probably fold or slide in/out somehow).

    I've already bought a hatch for the cockpit floor; the batteries are going down there.

    ...Yes, lots of plans slowly coming together. Gonna do a lot of sailing next year
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    Last edited by Brent; 07-31-2002 at 08:25 AM.

  9. #24
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,534

    MSD and the masthead fitting

    Thought I would use that hole in the boat just behind the tiller. Like the royalty of old dumping out their castle windows.

    Tony, as you may have read here I'm doing a bunch of unauthorized alterations. There'll be a new bulkhead right where the original head used to be where I can imagine a Lavac with a small holding tank on the forward side of the bulkhead in the forepeak. That's an other time. There'll be a sanipotti in the V just where it used to be and a curtain at the compression beam.

    omygod I forgot about the mast!
    No, that spar in the photo was just conveniently in the way at the yard. But I really have an aesthetic problem with the standard conduit tube spreaders on the mast. Ballenger Spars in Santa Cruz has nice cast wing spreaders that can be retroed. They also make a hefty tabernacle-step. that looks VERY interesting to me.

    I would like to replace the masthead 'crane fitting because it is deeply pitted and untrustworthy looking on 338's mast. I saw a lot of stainless steel and aluminum spreaders at Ballengers but never thought to ask them about the toppiece.

    Perhaps as was suggested on another thread we could get an order together for a brand new casting. Ballenger could tell us if this is feasible.

    I've read somewhere, maybe here, of a fix made to a broken flange by welding on another plate over it as reinforcement. But that is a working loaded fitting that I'd think needs replacement because it's old, maybe stress cracks in it etc. It would be cool to have a replacement available. Will somebody look intoit?

  10. #25
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
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    1,099
    Well, Ebb, nearly a month has drifted by and we haven't seen any pictures of 338. Please don't tell me this 'work' thing is getting in the way of everybody's fun. I like to think it only hampers MY progress. You mentioned some products from Ballenger Spars-spreaders and a tabernacle. The idea of a tabernacle really appeals to me 'cause I doubt I could round up enough friends to help me step the mast so I'll probably be sinlehanding that too. A lot less comand issues that way! Does the mast drop (or maybe I should say lower)foward or aft with that design?
    The more I think of what you said about the line formed by the deck and the cabin the more I like it. Open the whole place up! Shortly after I brought 113 home a friend dropped by to look at her and that's what he recomended. At the time I thought he was crazier than a **** house rat but it turns out that is what I'm leaning toward.(what have I become?) Did you do away with your V-berth all together but still call the area a v-berth or will it still be sleeping quarters? You know we're all curious as to just what you're doing, especially after Bill volunteered himself and Gene to do the photo shoot.
    Tony G.

  11. #26
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    Hey, Tony..... I expect it was a gorgeous day all over the nation, while I was up and down the ladder framing in support for the stunted V berth - maybe they're forward settees since the 'V' is now the anchor locker (where the watertank used to be.) evreybody else was out sailing.

    A settee is a berth too short to sleep on.

    I'm putting in cleats (ie wood supports) under the ply top. To provide continuity for the compression beam load and forward to provide support for the new end of the ply. The bulkhead under the V is not tabbed or attached to the hull. It was plunked in place with some blue sanded polygoop mostly because it doesn't fit too well. I'm putting in 'cleats' along the hull and up the front. There is a filler piece in this frame ( under the compression beam verticals that end on the settee) taking the compression load to the hull. In theory.

    There will be two new tanks custom made for the V-berth settees. THerefor the cleats there will not be radiused and tabbed to the hull to allow the poplyethylene tanks to fit snug. I'll radius and tab the other sides. The anchor and chain well will be over built. The anchor well is accessed from the deck thru a 19x19 Bomar cast/lexan hatch.

    Below there will be an 'escape' access hatch thru the new bulkhead which will be watertight (anchorwell drain?) more or less conforming to the ORC "15% abaft the forward perpendicular" for such a bulkhead, Actually, right there at the end of the foredeck it's about 20%.

    I really hated the old furniture and the dark plastic bulkhead. It's wonderful that it's gone. Fairing the turrett area with 410 and my local noblush epoxy while not easy was very satisfying. And photogenic Hope Bill and Gene come back with the recharged camera.

    Tony, I'm interested as to why you want to put batteries in the bilge (under the cabin sole) Perhaps we should go back to an earlier thread to thrash that one out, I'm still persuaded. Has anyone a cautionary tale about the water rising over the cabin sole on their boat?

    Hey, Brent, if yer here - how about some pics of your cockpit sole/ battery installation?

    Tabernacles, (another thread?) Have to tilt forward, tho I came across a site where the guy lowered to his aft coachroof (which was I believe taller than the Ariel's) where he had another fitting with a pivot pin that had to be inserted to continue the lowering aft. I have never lowered any mast. But the idea is to lower it with the boom as the outrigger down to rest in the pulpit in a roller there. Then you'ld have to pull the pin at the step and with some help haul the thing aft. It would sure be over ballanced over the pulpit. A cruiser would have to lower forward given all the gear on the coachroof. Ariel would have to have a tall european style tabernacle higher than the coach roof and whatever else is on top and IMCO a 'gallows' fitting on the pushpit to receive the spar. There probably are some clever no-big-deal rigs on sailboats who have to lower their masts to berth in the inner marina down in Santa Cruz. Bet they all lower forward using the boom

    The are numerous sites with numerous methods for lowering. You need a clever guy system for lateral control using your uppershrouds that keeps the triangulation taut as you lower or raise the mast. The latest one I read about had rings on the shrouds exactly level with the tabernacle pin. The lower part of the shroud is then stablized. But I have no idea how to rig it IMCO it has to be simple and accomplished singlehanded. YUP
    Last edited by ebb; 08-28-2002 at 07:59 AM.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Northern MN
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    1,099
    Ebb,
    Holy cows! It seems that you've got alot more done than I had gleaned from the posts. I'm still a little cloudy on how much of the original bulkhead remains and where the suport/compression posts go-but I realize I'm a 'challenged' indivdual when it comes to certain tasks.
    Yeah, how about that anchor well drain? I've read of other wells that drain overboard via a through hull. 1. Watertightlessness 2. UGLY and stained 3. Below the waterline (as you've probably guessed by now don't turn to me for ideas) Probably one of those inexpensive, infalable, pumps capable of handling solids and particular mater of up to 3/4" is the answere.
    As far as batteries go I ain't gonna put them down there. I don't even like to put my hand down there! It makes sense to put heavy weight that low but....I know water gets in there. I've thought about locating them under the cockpit sole like Brent, and I've thought about finding some room up front under the 'soon to be gone' main bulkhead in an effort to keep the load balanced-unsure. Right now I'm still focusing on destruction with a little thought on reconstruction. I agee with your cautionary statement, more tabbing, stringers and beams will be added in an effort to spread out the stress as more of the interior is removed.
    We have about two months before it starts to get too cold to work outside around here so maybe I'll at least get the destruction phase done this year.
    Holding fast for photos, Tony G

  13. #28
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    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,534

    holy moley a huge holey

    Imagine, Capt, T, where there was bulkhead, a narrow passage and chunky furniture. just an empty hole lined with oak. The remaining bulkhead is evident under the decks and as ends for the bunks.

    The first thing one notices going below is the wonderful graceful full curve of the deck and cabin going all way round port to starboard.

    The original support structure of the compression beam terminates at the V-berth ply, those supports were screwed to the bulkhead befor the micarta was glued on. There is a single miserable cleat support under the ply. The one on the main bulkhead is fastened with 6 brass screws ( 3 top and 3 side) with some finishing nails added for emphasis. However, the V-berth ply is tabbed to the hull and the main bulkhead - on the top only. Half of a good thing. On 338 some of this polyester and mat tabbing has come loose from the ply.

    The refit beam overhead is 5/16" strip laminated white oak, sided 5'' by 3"
    Glued with a mash of epoxy/cabosil/chopped glass to decrease squeeze-out when clampped wet into the bending frame. Simple L-brackets on a plywood back in the curve of the pattern of the roof. Three pieces at a time left to set in the jig with light as possible clamping and it's done. Beltsand and cut to the pattern on the bandsaw. Piece of cheese.

    Each end is lapjoined with a 3"x2" vertical that goes down to the V-berth using the coachroof side to get the angle. It's glued with the same mash to the bulkhead, and the blkhd which is so conveniently used for the assembly is trimmed back with the Hitatshi to the oak. So there's original plywood going all way round.

    The post above explains the mahogany 'cleating' to spread the load of the abruptly ended vertical braces to the hull underneath the plywood berth and broaden the interface of the bulkhead/hull join in this heayily loaded area.

    I remembered to rabbet the beam on the inside bottom edge which is almost directly under the center hole the mast electrics enter thru the deck. This will take the wires in a kind of chase to the sides of this wide opening. One guy came aboard and said, It's bigger than a Triton down here! Ofcourse there's no furniture in it yet.

    IMCO: What I say here and what I"m doing to 338 don't make it right and don't make it wrong, it's just what I'm doing.
    Last edited by ebb; 08-28-2002 at 08:05 AM.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
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    3,534

    pumps be a good thread

    Tony, Course the chain locker being so low it couldn't have an overboard like those big yachts what carry their bowers in their noses. good point. You are right. Good idea. There should be a pump for this locker and it's obviously the Anybody know a better one? Important rule: Never drain a forward bilge into an after bilge. Especially if it's supposed to be watertight!!!

    One for the bilge, one for the head, and one for the anchor well hand op er a ted.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orinda, California
    Posts
    2,237

    P26 REFIT TO ALBERG SPECS

    The latest Good Old Boat arrived and it has an article on turning a Pearson 26 (the Shaw design that followed Alberg's Ariel and Commander) into a cruiser. The author has gone in the exact opposite direction of Ebb! The open P26 interior was closed in and it now looks much like the stock Ariel interior!

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